boor


boor
boor, churl, lout, clown, clodhopper, bumpkin, hick, yokel, rube are comparable when meaning an uncouth, ungainly fellow. Most of these words may be applied to rustics, but they tend increasingly to imply reference to breeding, manners, and appearance rather than to origin or social status. The same distinctions in connotations and implications are apparent in the adjectives derived from the first four of these nouns, boorish, churlish, loutish, clownish.
Boor implies an opposition to gentleman, especially in respect to characteristics indicative of good breeding and fineness of feeling. As a rule boor and boorish imply variously rudeness of manner, insensitiveness, lack of ceremony, or unwillingness to be agreeable in the presence of others
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love makes gentlemen even of boors, whether noble or villain— Henry Adams

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to the European mind, with all its goodwill, the very things that make us more powerful make us also more boorishLemer

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Churl may suggest low birth or social status but more often ill-bred surly meanness of expression or attitude. The latter implication is far more common in the adjective churlish, which characteristically implies surliness, irresponsiveness, or ungraciousness
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warns all whom it concerns, from King to churlJohn Morley

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by what magic wasMt that this divine sweet creature could be allied with that old churlMeredith

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they object to the dairymaids and men crossing the elm vista .... It seems churlishShaw

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Lout and loutish apply especially to hulky youths or men without regard to origin and usually suggest stupidity, clumsiness, and sometimes, abjectness of bearing or demeanor. Both words are terms of contempt frequently applied to idlers or loafers of particularly unprepossessing appearance
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it was inevitable that the older boys should become mischievous louts; they bullied and tormented and corrupted the younger boys because there was nothing else to do— H. G. Wells

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Clown and clownish come close to lout and loutish in connotation. Instead of stupidity, however, the terms often connote ignorance or simplicity and instead of hulkiness they suggest the ungainliness of a person whose body and movements reveal hard plodding labor
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the clown, the child of nature, without guile— Cowper

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When used in reference to those who are not countrymen the terms still imply general uncouthness and awkwardness and often, by association with the other sense of clown, a propensity for absurd antics
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he was the sort of boy that becomes a clown and a lout as soon as he is not understood, or feels himself held cheap— D. H. Lawrence

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Clodhopper distinctively suggests the frame and the heavy movements generally associated with plowmen but is not restricted in application to rustics
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though honest and active they're most unattractive and awkward as awkward can be—can be. They're clumsy clodhoppersGilbert

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Bumpkin implies a loutishness suggestive of unfamiliarity with city ways and manners
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bashful country bumpkinsIrving

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Hick comes close to bumpkin and suggests the unsophisticated simple rustic
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hicks of the hinterlands mistrusting city politicians

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Yokel and rube more particularly suggest a rustic lack of polish or an obtuse gullibility
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his mouth was agape in yokel fashion— Crane

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always a new crop of rubes waiting to be tricked out of their money

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Antonyms: gentleman

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • Boor — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Carl de Boor (* 1937), deutsch US amerikanischer Mathematiker Carl Gotthard de Boor (1848–1923), deutscher Byzantinist Friedrich de Boor (* 1933), deutscher Theologe Hans Otto de Boor (1886–1956),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Boor — may refer to: *boor, a peasant or uncultured person * Laughing Boor with a Pot of Beer , painting by Isaac van Ostade * The Boor , an opera by Dominick Argentoee also*Bore, disambiguation page *de Boor, surname disambiguation page …   Wikipedia

  • boor — boor·ish; boor·tree; boor; boor·ish·ly; boor·ish·ness; …   English syllables

  • Boor — (b[=oo]r), n. [D. boer farmer, boor; akin to AS. geb[=u]r countryman, G. bauer; fr. the root of AS. b[=u]an to inhabit, and akin to E. bower, be. Cf. {Neighbor}, {Boer}, and {Big} to build.] 1. A husbandman; a peasant; a rustic; esp. a clownish… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • boor — [boor] n. [Du boer < MDu gheboer, fellow dweller < ghe , with, CO + bouwen, to build, cultivate; akin to Ger bauer: see BONDAGE] 1. Archaic a peasant or farm worker 2. a rude, awkward, or ill mannered person …   English World dictionary

  • boor — /boor/, n. 1. a churlish, rude, or unmannerly person. 2. a country bumpkin; rustic; yokel. 3. peasant. 4. Boer. [1545 55; < D boer or LG bur (c. G Bauer farmer), deriv. of Gmc *bu to dwell, build, cultivate; see ER1; cf. BOND2] Syn. 1 …   Universalium

  • Boor — Boor,   Helmut de, Germanist, * Bonn 24. 3. 1891, ✝ Berlin (West) 4. 8. 1976; war Professor in Leipzig, Bern und Berlin (Freie Universität, 1949 59); begründete mit H. Newald das Sammelwerk »Geschichte der deutschen Literatur« (auf mehrere Bände… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • boor — [buə US bur] n [Date: 1500 1600; : Dutch; Origin: boer; BOER] a man who behaves in a very rude way >boorish adj >boorishly adv …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • boor — [ bur ] noun count someone who behaves in a rude way and ignores other people s feelings …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • boor — (n.) 13c., from O.Fr. bovier herdsman, from L. bovis, gen. of bos cow, ox. Re introduced 16c. from Du. boer, from M.Du. gheboer fellow dweller, from P.Gmc. *buram dweller, especially farmer, from PIE *bhu , from root *bheue (see BE …   Etymology dictionary


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